Unidentified Shipwrecks

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On numerous occasions, particularly before the introduction of modern communications, the first knowledge of a wreck occuring was when remains of the vessel and/or its cargo were discovered at sea and/or washed ashore.

For many varied reasons a positive identification sometimes proved impossible, some because they were so smashed to pieces against rocks in heavy weather, others due to the fact wreckage was strewn over a massive area of coastline, and nothing identifiable was discovered in the relatively few human accessible locations where it ended up, to name but two. Official records in times past were often sparse, or have not survived, adding to the list of unidentifiables.

Despite their name remaining a secret to the depths which claimed them, a reasonable amount of information is known about some of these vessels, as well as many more, as would be expected, that little is known other then some vessel wrecked at a general presumed location around a presumed date.

Details of all such vessels, along with a number of smaller inshore, often fishing vessels, which had no name, can be found on the following relevant year pages.

Contents

20th Century

1900, 1906, 1909, 1910, 1922, 1923, 1941 & 1953.

19th Century

1800, 1803, 1806, 1811, 1815, 1817, 1819, 1820, 1822, 1824, 1825, 1827, 1830, 1832, 1840, 1844, 1845, 1847, 1848, 1850, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1857, 1858, 1860, 1862, 1863, 1864, 1865, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1873, 1874, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1887, 1891, 1892, 1894, 1895, 1897, 1898, & 1899.

18th Century

1700, 1702, 1705, 1706, 1710, 1720, 1721, 1725, 1730, 1731, 1733, 1734, 1736, 1740, 1741, 1744, 1745, 1747, 1748, 1750, 1756, 1758, 1762, 1763, 1764, 1765, 1768, 1771, 1774, 1775, 1776, 1777, 1778, 1779, 1785, 1786, 1791, 1792, 1795, 1798 & 1799.

17th Century and earlier

1600, 1601, 1602, 1604, 1610, 1611, 1620, 1650, 1667, 1669, 1672, 1680, 1693 & 1694.

1524 & 1591.

1400.

1300.

1242.

1000 & 1002.

0900.

0800.

Unknown Date

An unidentified vessel, owned by Alderman Bell, and registered in Dublin, Ireland, is recorded as having wrecked on Bressay.

The record lists from the same source, two unidentified, Norwegian registered vessels, as having driven ashore and wrecked on Unst sometime during World War II. One in the SE part of Burra Firth, in the vicinity of Buddabrake, and the other at a location only identified as the "Noost Stone" in Harold's Wick.

A wreck is known to be located at a position approx 10 Km ESE of Mousa, Sandwick.

A wreck was located by Royal Navy divers in the vicinity of Little Holm (Yell Sound) in 1983.

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